The Star Wars films have not only left an impact in our society and the film industry, but also created a myriad of symbols and phrases that anyone who even somewhat knows the movies would recognize. “Luke, I am your father,” Darth Vader’s chilling mask, Chewy’s powerful call, and, of course, the unforgettable lightsabers.

But what most people don’t know, except maybe the uber Star Wars fanatics, is that the lightsabers were inspired by a simple Graflex camera flash handle. DigitalRev  did a video about how the camera flash became a part of the most popular film series of all time. The narrator of the video said when making the Star Wars films, director George Lucas wanted the galactic world he was portraying to look “lived in,” and he did this by using old, junky props. The first film, Star Wars: A New Hope, was made on an extremely low budget, using materials that were inexpensive and easy to obtain.

Set decorator, Roger Christian, was sent by Lucas in search of the perfect prop to be the weapon of choice for the characters in the Star Wars universe. He scoured through antique shops and thrift stores, but finally came across the perfect candidate in a small photography shop in London.

Graflex Camera Flash Camera/ Screen grab from “How A Camera Flash Became Star Wars Legend.”

Set decorator, Roger Christian, was sent by Lucas in search of the perfect prop to be the weapon of choice for the characters in the Star Wars universe. He scoured through antique shops and thrift stores, but finally came across the perfect candidate in a small photography shop in London.

Once you remove the handle from the Graflex camera, paint it with blue projection material, put a light on it so it glows—and boom, you’ve got yourself a lightsaber. Christian built the first two original lightsabers for $15, and in 2012, they were sold to the Seattle Museum of Pop Culture for $250,000, making it one of the most expensive movie weapon props in cinema history. Luke Skywalker and Darth Vader’s lightsabers both originate from photography equipment. The chances of finding a Graflex camera now are very slim, especially one that doesn’t cost over $1,000. Some photographers who enjoy collecting old equipment blame the Star Wars franchise for making the camera so popular.

Screen grab from That One Yokel

Watch the DigitalRev video above for more on how the Graflex flash become a Star Wars legend!