Facebook has always been the leader of questionable privacy policies. After all, Zuckerburg does have the power to push a couple buttons, making your private albums go public, and firing personal images into the public domain, riddling your timeline with all your hidden drunk pics. Like any popular social media platform, porn has also creeped into the inner-workings of your social life, but now Facebook, perhaps the unlikeliest contender of all, wants to protect you from your bad decisions and nude selfies. Yes, I’m talking about revenge porn.

In case you don’t often partake in modern day swooning, sending your bae nude photos or videos is not an uncommon practice. However, when things go south, there’s a lot of material that can be used for evil, and the internet has created a sufficient community of shameful ex’s hungry for revenge. Aside from Facebook, there are also a variety of sites, such as www.myex.com, www.getrevengeonyourex.com, and shesahomewrecker.com, that attract this malicious behavior.

In a January 2016 episode of ‘Dark Net,’ Anisha Vora explains her horrific revenge porn attacks by her ex boyfriend that started in 2012. He reportedly posted nude photos of her to hundreds of sites, including Facebook and Tumblr. These attacks were escalated by adding her contact info to posts, listings and photos mostly pretending to be her, engaging in conversation with strangers.

Some situations led to suggestions of rape fantasies that brought strangers to her house, pushing their way in and assuming her resistance was part of the fantasy. None of the websites that hosted these non-consented photos offered any protection for Vora.

Now Facebook has taken the first step in protecting users from situations like this, providing tools to prevent revenge porn. Here are some of way the social network is doing so:

1. Users may report photos that are posted without their permission and victims may follow a guide that Facebook has created here.

2. The users who post photos that are removed will have their accounts disabled (with the option to appeal this decision with Facebook).

3. Photo-matching technology will prevent removed photos from being re-uploaded.

4. Facebook is working on furthering this technology by developing an alert system to the subject of the photo that is being attempted to be re-uploaded a second time. However, this will be a development for the future.

5. Facebook is working with several organizations to create support and information for victims and users including the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative and The United States Marine Corps.

Of course, the best way to protect yourself is to simply refrain from sending a dick pic or booty shot. Still, it’s good to know that social media giants are making moves to protect its users from cyber attacks, given that only 35 states have revenge porn laws in place, many of which are only misdemeanor violations.