That’s right, you read that correctly. Amazon is selling a book titled “An Introduction to Camera Game: How to Seduce Women Through Photography” by someone known simply as Goldmund—and it is as unsettling as it sounds.

With sexual misconduct allegations that have swept the creative and entertainment industries in the past weeks, the content of this book seems all too close to the disturbing revelations of men using their professional or artistic status as a way of getting unexperienced girls into bed. The book’s intro seems to hammer home the point that “Photography can enhance your social skills,” which is certainly true as photography is an intimate practice and communication between the photographer and subject is crucial. However, Goldmund goes on to write, “I will break that down so you can start creating pictures of beaming women gazing intensely who clearly have sex on the mind.”

Hold up. Women who “clearly have sex on the mind”? Goldmund continues his intro by boasting about his perfected “script” he uses to get laid, a technique he plans to share in the following 90 pages, to help other dudes more easily manipulate girls through their camera and feigned charm.

With the number of actresses and models who have come forward in the past months about their experiences with unwanted sexual advances, harassment, and abuse from more established men in their industry, this book makes my skin crawl. While it is easy to say that this interpretation is taking it too far, or that Goldmund didn’t intend anything sinister with his book, the bottom line is simple—luring women into working with you in the hopes of using them for sex is sexual harassment in the workplace. This book encourages men to turn up the charisma and promise “experience” to women, all in the hopes of getting laid, thus objectifying the woman. This is a huge problem for a number of reasons. If a woman agrees to a modeling job it is assumed she’d like to be taken seriously, and this approach immediately makes her a means to an end. This highlights one of the biggest obstacles faced by women in creative industries, especially young and inexperienced ones, as they are often seen more for sexual opportunity than for talent and legitimate contribution to a project. Additionally, any man who claims to know what a woman “clearly” wants is automatically wrong in their presumptuous entitlement. The only way to know what a woman clearly wants is if she verbalizes this to you, not if she agrees to your photography shoot and looks longingly into the lens, because…well…that’s her job as a model.

It is no wonder that 89% of reviewers on Amazon rated the book a 1 star, with many people drawing attention to its blatant promotion of harassment and it’s shocking lack of self-awareness.

Of course there are also those reviewers who rated the book 5 stars, attempting to shame others for their hasty assumptions that “lump all men together” and for their harsh judgement of the book that actually does “offer insight”, give valid “depth and technique details”, and serves as “good motivation” to young photographers. While I don’t doubt that the book’s author may be a skilled photographer with decent insight into the industry, the unsettling underlying message it presents remains the same—and anyone who can’t see this is part of the problem.

  • So through your fake outrage you are in fact providing a valuable promotional & marketing tool for a product that you claim to find offensive. You’ve promoted it via your newsletter, here on your web site and also provided an Amazon affiliates link (as of this posting) allowing you to make a few $$ from the books sale.
    So through your blatant hypocrisy you have in fact positioned yourself as part of the problem.

    • Bridget Schneider

      Hey James!
      I hear you–calling attention to a product does expose people to it, regardless of if it’s negative or positive, potentially leading to their purchasing of that product. Your take on this article is interesting, but I’m not sure I see how my very obvious, outright disapproval of this book equates to my promoting of the product. There is no way to talk about these disturbing issues, like the problem of sexual harassment in the workplace I discuss here, without exposing the very people and products that foster the problem. This article is a genuine expression of my disturbance with this book, and anyone who would purchase the product through my supposed “promotion” of it has very, very clearly missed the point. Also, Resource doesn’t have an Amazon affiliate, the link that you are referring to is simply a source of where I got some of my info.

    • Bridget Schneider

      Hey James!
      I hear you–calling attention to a product does expose people to it, regardless of if it’s negative or positive, potentially leading to their purchasing of that product. Your take on this article is interesting, but I’m not sure I see how my very obvious, outright disapproval of this book equates to my promoting of the product. There is no way to talk about these disturbing issues, like the problem of sexual harassment in the workplace I discuss here, without exposing the very people and products that foster the problem. This article is a genuine expression of my disturbance with this book, and anyone who would purchase the product through my supposed “promotion” of it has very, very clearly missed the point. Also, Resource doesn’t have an Amazon affiliate, the link that you are referring to is simply a source of where I got some of my info.

      • “There is no way to talk about these disturbing issues, like the problem of sexual harassment in the workplace I discuss here, without exposing the very people and products that foster the problem.”

        1st – YES there absolutly is!
        You just do it rather making excuses as to why you can not talk about it or shout it from the roof tops.

        2nd – Yes you do expose these people, you name names, you recount instances verbatim as to what was said and too whom and when.
        To do other wise is to remain complicate and part of the problem.

        As to the legal aspect of this, the following is well within your legal rights to say:
        “While working at/with (xyz) I saw …”
        “I was on set and “BLANK” Said/Told/Directed/ Instructed…”

        Any statement of fact made in the 1st person (I heard , I Saw) is legal and NOT libelous or slander.
        It will however black list you from working with certain people or most of the commercial photo industry, because politics rules this business just as severely as Hollywood.

        I have worked on photo productions for the past 28 years and been witness to these events 1st hand. And early on it was not uncommon for me to be propositioned while on set. This crap goes both ways. I simply stopped working for the scumbags.
        But what I found more disturbing is the Art Dir.’s & Photo Editors (all women) who have tolerated this type of behavior from photographers and crew members as “de’ rigueur”.
        Such as those that knowingly allowed “Fluffers” onset for the photographer and his crew and billed them as a production expense.
        The hundreds of photographers that got into this business because their complete lack of social and communication skills prevented them from other wise meeting potential lovers (men & women photographers)
        I worked with a famous Italian photographer that held castings everyday for 2 weeks looking for a 19 yr old red head that he thought he could entice with an advertising job and then bed.

        Time to peel the veneer off of this industry and clean house.
        If you are going to take a stand, do so boldly and with out cover.