One of the most crucial and overlooked factors of a professional photographer’s existence: their website. In this day in age, almost everything we want to know is only a click away, and rarely print, so your portfolio needs a good website to reside in.

It’s crucial to share your work with the audience to the best of your ability. Consider how you and your work should be represented, while keeping it active and up to date. If you need a little boost in the direction of creating a perfect website, consider these tips and tricks.

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User Friendly – It’s super important to make your website easy and smooth sailing for all. Most people, especially future clients rather not take more time navigating a website due to its complicated nature. As we see in most photography website’s layouts the opening landmark page has direct shortcuts, which is best. Also consider organizing your portfolio, make the name of your series as clear as possible, so that it opens and displays what the user imagined it would. In most cases, people will search photography websites to view your work, so getting them to it the quickest and hassle-free way, is key.

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Defining Image – What photo represents you and your work’s philosophy best? If you can narrow it down, do so with one image, and let it be the first display users see when going on your website. It’s also a huge perk for employers to understand what image, project, subject, and setting embodies you most. So try and give as much of ‘you’ as you can in one highlighted photograph.

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Short And Sweet Bio – Let the user know who you are, what goes behind your photography, how it all started and maybe even an update on what you’re doing now. Going on someone else’s website, and stepping into their world requires a briefing on the man or woman behind the curtain. Employers want to know a bit about you before they jump the gun. Being informative is great, but we would advise you to stray away from spieling your whole life story, because most visitors are on on your photography website for the imagery.

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Include Range – This is important for future employers to affectively measure your creative capacity and range for different projects they have in mind. Showing what contrasted techniques and spectrums you can jump from and to is always a big advantage. Plus, once they know what you’re capable of, they can book you accordingly.

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Key Details – Supply your website with all the right contact info, considering people have deadlines to meet and can’t rely on when you can reply or not. Your social media accounts are a great addition for contacting you, keeping you under radar, and for getting familiar with the work you do. If you decide you want to show your rates on your website, that’s on you. But, it’s probably best to wait to give a price on your work after you understand the scope of the project. There’s plenty to consider before you put a number on it, plus you don’t want that specific price to be held against you later on.

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Your Work Above Else – If you don’t have the time or money to design a perfectly sleek and professional website, make sure your work can overpower that factor. Put your portfolio on a pedestal, since this website was created for it in the first place. It’s refreshing to see a little back story behind each series, honoring the significance and reason it was worthy of your snap.

Furthermore, it’s key that you put your own personal flare into the website, to define it as your own. It’s nice to appeal to a certain audience, but remember it’s your projects and your fulfillment above all, so stay true to it!