Living in New York, new construction is in such abundance that you don’t even bother to think twice about the implications of the new buildings. Whether that be the relocation of previous tenants, the gentrification of a neighborhood, the time, money, and manpower that goes into the construction itself, or any of the other infinite number of repercussions and results. It’s an ever-changing entity that has to be experienced in years see its actual implications 

Naoya Hatakeyama, Untitled/Osaka, 1998; from Naoya Hatakeyama: Excavating the Future City (Aperture/Minneapolis Institute of Art, 2018)

Japanese photographer Naoya Hatakeyama captures photos with this in mind. For 30 years, he has been examining the transformation of cites. His series focuses on the life of the built environment and urban landscapes, from architectural maquettes to the construction of new buildings using the remnants of those that have been demolished.

Though his focus is particularly on the Tokyo-Yokohama metropolis, the life and death of the constructed environment is a universal theme recognizable to anyone living in a developing world.

Naoya Hatakeyama, #6411, 1999, from the series Underground; from Naoya Hatakeyama: Excavating the Future City (Aperture/Minneapolis Institute of Art, 2018)

In the same vein, Hatakeyama also captures human intervention in landscapes and natural materials in the construction of factories and building sites around the world. 

Naoya Hatakeyama, #02607, Loos-en-Gohelle, Pas-de-Calais, Hauts-de- France, France, 2009, from the series Terrils; from Naoya Hatakeyama: Excavating the Future City (Aperture/Minneapolis Institute of Art, 2018)

Most recently, Hatakeyama has focused on his hometown of Rikuzentakata, which was destroyed by the earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. He begin the project just after the disaster, tracking the the rebirth of the city through the intersection of geology, architecture, and time.

Naoya Hatakeyama, #41408, 1994, from the series Lime Works; from Naoya Hatakeyama: Excavating the Future City (Aperture/Minneapolis Institute of Art, 2018)

Currently, his photos are being shown at the Minneapolis Institute of Art which will coincide with the release of his new book: Naoya Hatakeyama: Excavating the Future City. Available on April 1st, the book will feature 164 of his images imbedded in the theme of city expansion and everything spoken about above. The book also features essays by Yasufumi Nakamori, PhD, the curator and head of the department of photography and new media at the Minneapolis Institute of Art.

You can buy the book HERE for $51…

Cover Photo Caption:

Naoya Hatakeyama, #08316, 1999, from the series Blast; from Naoya
Hatakeyama: Excavating the Future City (Aperture/Minneapolis Institute of Art, 2018)