Resource Photo. Video. Lifestyle. 2018-04-21T17:00:32Z http://resourcemagonline.com/feed/atom/ WordPress Cody Lewis <![CDATA[This is A First: Two Computer-Generated Instagram Influencers Feud]]> http://resourcemagonline.com/?p=89074 2018-04-20T20:15:14Z 2018-04-21T17:00:32Z Okay, so there are these fake Instagram influencers that we wrote about a few weeks back. They are profiles of digital humans who post and pose like real humans (at least like real life Instagram influencers—which, we could get into whether they post and pose like humans but that’s not the point), but in fact […]

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Okay, so there are these fake Instagram influencers that we wrote about a few weeks back. They are profiles of digital humans who post and pose like real humans (at least like real life Instagram influencers—which, we could get into whether they post and pose like humans but that’s not the point), but in fact are the work of a digital artist. These things are fully committed to playing it off like they are real.

So perhaps it was inevitable that a feud between two digitally created Instagram influencers would eventually happen…because in real life feuds happen (yes, even on Instagram) and why should this be any different? And yes, I realize that that that sentence is really fucking stupid. But what’s even stupider is the fact that, recently, this actually happened. Or kind of, ish.

This is what went down:

The Fighters:

In the right corner, we have Miquela Sousa aka lil Miquela. With over a million followers, the 19 year old Brazilian-American uses Instagram to showcase her life as a model, singer (she has two singles on Spotify), and overall trendy-hip ass chick.

Instagram Photo

In the left we have Bermuda, a Trump supporter and Iggy Azalea fan, who went from 2,000 to 60 thousands followers over the course of this dispute.

Instagram Photo

The Beef:

In August, Bermuda posted a photo with the caption: “@LilMiquela you can only hide for so long.” A few months later, in January, Bermuda posted a quote of Lil Miquela stating  “I live for the drama” when asked about internet hate. Bermuda then added “I don’t think you ‘live for’ the kind of drama I have in mind. Just remember…you brought this on yourself.”

Finally, a few days ago Bermuda said the following in a post: “Ok, Miquela. I tried being nice. I called, I texted. I didn’t want this to be hard, but you brought this on yourself. See you tomorrow, world”

The Takeover:

So, on Tuesday, Bermuda hacked into Miquela’s account, deleted all her post, and then shared six of her own post (four of which were selfies). In these post, amongst other things, she called Lil Miquela a “fake ass person” and told Lil Miquela that she would only give her her account back once she told people “the truth.”

I know, this is a lot to handle.

Bermuda eventually gave Lil Miquela her account back and all her photos were restored, but the kicker is that Bermuda told her she had 48 hours to “tell the world the truth” or she would do it for her.

So….

The two influencers “met” and even shared a picture of the two of them together. In the caption, Bermuda wrote: “More emotional than I thought it would be. Despite it all, there’s only three of us out there and we need to stick together. We talked it through and she said she’s going to come clean tomorrow.”

The big reveal: Lil Miquela isn’t a real person.

In the post she says that the “truth” was revealed to her by Bermuda. And to sum it up, she thought she was real, her life is based on real person named Miquela Sousa, her creator lied to her and so did other people, and now she knows the truth but is having trouble accepting it. Shit, just read the post below. It’s as weird as it sounds.

Instagram Photo

So what is this? A publicity stunt? But for what? More followers? I guess that worked. I’m writing about it now. 

Maybe the creators are bored. Maybe the creators are just making fun of Instagram influencers in general or the fact that a fake profile can even exist gain as many followers as it has. Maybe a commentary on our current society.

Fuck if I know.

The world is a strange place right now.

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Elisabeth Heleba <![CDATA[Tom from MySpace is Now A Photographer—And He’s Actually Pretty Good]]> http://resourcemagonline.com/?p=88823 2018-04-20T19:01:45Z 2018-04-21T14:01:11Z It turns out your first friend on MySpace is not just a one-trick-pony. After retiring as a multi-millionaire, Tom Anderson, one of the founders of MySpace, became a photographer, traveling the globe. When you see his Instagram page you will not only be jealous of his lifestyle, but of his ability to take fairly amazing […]

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It turns out your first friend on MySpace is not just a one-trick-pony.

After retiring as a multi-millionaire, Tom Anderson, one of the founders of MySpace, became a photographer, traveling the globe. When you see his Instagram page you will not only be jealous of his lifestyle, but of his ability to take fairly amazing photos.

Anderson launched his career as the co-founder of MySpace in 2003.  Users knew him as “Tom from MySpace”, as he would automatically become their friend once they became a member of the site.

When MySpace was bought by News Corp in 2005, Anderson became the president of the social networking platform. The young entrepreneur retired from the MySpace universe in 2009, hoping his retirement would give him the opportunity to explore architecture and design—a field he had always found intriguing.

Tom anderson, myspace

So after leaving MySpace, Anderson successfully designed and built three homes before becoming fascinated with a new hobby:  photography.  He says that he picked up the practice—no surprise here—at Burning Man festival.

While many entrepreneurs might turn a new hobby into a way to make money, Anderson says this was not his intention when he started working with the camera. Retiring at age 39, he vowed to do one thing—relax.

Even as Anderson has become more serious with his photographic work, he refuses to turn his hobby into a money-making endeavor.

“I haven’t wanted to take commissions or sell my photos, or do anything commercial with it—that would just feel like work, which I don’t want to do,” he said.

Instead of making a business of it, Anderson has taken to Instagram to share his work for free. With just over 650k followers, he’s beginning to make a name for himself as more than just “Tom from Myspace”: preferring the nom de guerre @myspacetomincredible travel photographer.

Hobbies are something that we should be able to do out of free will, not because we have to in order to survive. Anderson’s unique early career has allowed him to do just that—working on his photography without worrying about making a commission from it.

Anderson, it seems, is doing retirement just right. This writer can only hope that—after sixty years have gone by—she’ll have enough money, after paying off student loans, to travel outside of the country. And maybe take a few pictures while she’s at it, too.

 

 

 

 

 

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Alexander Breindel <![CDATA[We Visited The VR Exhibit At The Museum Of Sex: Here’s What We Saw, Heard, Touched, and Felt]]> http://resourcemagonline.com/?p=89035 2018-04-20T18:47:46Z 2018-04-20T20:00:49Z We entered a dark room lined with velvet rope. Walking up three flight of stairs, we entered an even darker room. Two plush leather benches stood ahead of us, the kind you’d expect in a museum housing a bar serving breast-shaped jello shots. To our right, conspicuously good-looking flight attendants stood behind a counter, ready […]

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We entered a dark room lined with velvet rope. Walking up three flight of stairs, we entered an even darker room. Two plush leather benches stood ahead of us, the kind you’d expect in a museum housing a bar serving breast-shaped jello shots. To our right, conspicuously good-looking flight attendants stood behind a counter, ready to book our trip to “space.”

When Resource first heard of Celestial Bodies, we assumed we’d be visiting. Promising great visuals, loud music, and raunch, you could say the exhibit found us. So after clearing it with HR—the exhibit is billed as a “couples” experience, after all—two us headed up to the Museum of Sex in downtown Manhattan.  

The gallery itself is limited to four participants at a time—we waited in a dark room lined with black foam, with various cubes glowing a dull white serving as seats. Packing our excess gear into lockers, we were offered shots. Soon, our names were called. We were shuttled down a hallway of numbered doors to which we were each assigned. Entering mine, I was greeted by another space-flight attendant, this time serving as my guide.  

Led to a circular platform, my back against the wall, an Oculus headset was placed over my eyes, headphones over my ears. Empty space occupied my vision in all directions, while a large pink sign ahead of me announced I had entered “Celestial Bodies.” The electronic thumping of Diplo, meanwhile, drowned out my inner monologue. After a brief ride in an “elevator”(the VR had begun), its doors opened, inviting me to emerge outward onto a platform of nothing but empty space.

One of the more miraculous parts of VR is its ability to stoke the fear of death. One time while playing “Richie’s Plank”—a game in which the user walks across a plank stuck out from the roof of an 80-story building—I found myself completely unable to move, despite the attendants’ prodding. Similarly, a zombie racing in my direction once made me call for help. So when a voice told me to leave the elevator in “Celestial Bodies” and I looked down, seeing nothing visible to step on, I thought, “Oh shit.” I was not surprised to hear afterwards that others had in the past requested to exit the game at this point—I considered doing the same.

The view from “Richie’s Plank”

Luckily, “Celestial Bodies” offers a saving grace: railings. Holding on for dear life, I made my way to the platform where the experience was to take place, pride intact. The area was delineated by gridded lights on the floor, and besides these indicated boundaries, we were free to roam. In my less self-conscious moments, I even danced.

The show includes two main attractions, one after the other. First, an infinitely long stripper pole appears in the platform’s center, descended by nude, metallic woman in various poses indicating their wealth of core strength. I reached out to feel them, as advised, but to no avail—they disintegrated at my touch into tiny pink particles.

After a few minutes, the pole disappears and another figure steps onto the scene. This one appears angelic, surrounded by feathers and, rather than suspended in air, walking amongst our group. As I go to touch, I am surprised as I am touched back. The feathers, as it turns out, are very real, and extremely soft. I nervously laugh as they cross my skin, at once embarrassed and at ease.  

Eventually a voice comes over the audio channel announcing the experience has ended. To preserve the integrity of the virtual realm, “Celestial Bodies” employs a unique way of disengaging—my original guide was suddenly beside me, unseen, and took my hands, leading me out. When the headset is finally removed, I’m back where I started: dressing room #4.

Exiting to the lobby, my partner’s dumbfounded face tells me all I need to know. A VR rookie, I figured he’d be a good gauge of the average museumgoers’ experience. Turning slowly as if still unsure of his reality, he said to me, verbatim, “Fuck!”

As for me, this wasn’t my first VR rodeo. What makes “Celestial Bodies” unique in my experience, however, is its focus on unadulterated pleasure. Unlike gaming or educational programs, it doesn’t require the user to do anything, but urges them simply to take it all in, touching or doing whatever they should desire. For a museum dedicated to hedonism, it makes perfect sense.

Over breast-shaped jello shots in the bar afterwards, my partner struck a more somber tone in reflecting on what we had just done. The possibilities of VR had sunk in, it seemed, and he was worried. We had just heard a tale of an elderly couple who, forgetting that what appeared in VR to be “space” was in fact an empty room full of employees, had taken the first step towards satisfying agoraphilia—it’s that immersive.

“We’re fucked,” he said. I rolled my eyes.   

“I mean Jesus,” he continued, as I wiped red sticky jello off my chin hairs, reading an article on my phone and only half listening, “we can’t even get off of Instagram, how the hell are we supposed to ever leave VR?”

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Elisabeth Heleba <![CDATA[KFC Marketing Team Blows Up With A New Ad Campaign]]> http://resourcemagonline.com/?p=89034 2018-04-20T17:43:44Z 2018-04-20T17:43:44Z There’s nothing more saliva-inducing than fried fast food. And there’s nothing more badass than a good explosion in an action film. The KFC marketing team has brought these both together in their newest ad campaign for hot and spicy chicken. After pairing with marketing team Ogilvy and Mather, KFC Hong Kong has released a series […]

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There’s nothing more saliva-inducing than fried fast food. And there’s nothing more badass than a good explosion in an action film. The KFC marketing team has brought these both together in their newest ad campaign for hot and spicy chicken.

After pairing with marketing team Ogilvy and Mather, KFC Hong Kong has released a series of images that, at first, you may not even recognize as an advertisement for chicken. Instead, you’ll see a fiery plume expelling from a rocket ship engine, and a cloud of exhaust forming behind a racecar.

rocket ship, chicken, KFC

racecar, chicken, KFC

When you look closer, however, you’ll recognize that the explosions aren’t explosions at all, but pieces of crispy, golden chicken.

The idea came to the creative team at Ogilvy and Mather when they were eating the hot and spicy chicken. Instead of demonstrating the spice through the cliched watering eyes and burning tongues, they took on an entirely new approach. The explosive idea was so simple yet brilliant, that they had to go with it, even if the execution of the idea was quite the project.

The team had to study several images of explosions before they were ready to create the campaign. When they finally worked on it, they spent hours on the lighting portion of the project. They had to ensure that the chicken truly did look like it was making a bang.

Until now, most people have not been aware of the multi-million ways fried chicken can fit into action shots like these, but KFC has demonstrated that—with a little imagination—you can turn fried chicken into anything, even the backdrop of an action film.

explosion, action film, fried chicken

People on the internet have been inspired by the flaming photos, and have tried their hand at creating fried-chicken-art.  Some people have saturated the colors from the chicken and created clouds of smoke seeping out of volcanoes. Others have painted landscapes in which the rocky mountains look like they’ve been made out of fried chicken.

Truly, the KFC ad has done more than get us to salivate; it’s opened up a whole new world of opportunity. Before you know it, we’ll be seeing Big Mac Moons and Chicken McNugget trees.

That said, even if another restaurant was able to duplicate the brilliance of this campaign, it is doubtful that they could ever reach the standards that the KFC marketing team has set for the industry. Since 2016, KFC has engaged in more than one marketing stunt that has surprised and appealed to audiences

In 2016, the company released a KFC-scented candle, and In April of 2017, they sent a chicken sandwich up to space. The KFC marketing team is always seeking to wow their audience, and they have not disappointed with this campaign.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Bridget Schneider <![CDATA[Planned Parenthood Made a VR Of What It’s Like to Experience Protestors’ Wrath]]> http://resourcemagonline.com/?p=88967 2018-04-20T18:42:06Z 2018-04-20T15:08:17Z Planned Parenthood has teamed up with a group of artists to create a virtual reality experience in the hopes of eliciting empathy and educating people on the harsh realities faced by women who seek care from the institution. Oftentimes Planned Parent buildings are surrounded by protesters seeking to intimidate and shame women who are visiting […]

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Planned Parenthood has teamed up with a group of artists to create a virtual reality experience in the hopes of eliciting empathy and educating people on the harsh realities faced by women who seek care from the institution.

Oftentimes Planned Parent buildings are surrounded by protesters seeking to intimidate and shame women who are visiting the clinic for serious medical issues, their main concern being the halting of abortion. These protesters are unwavering in their opposition to the healthcare service that all women should be entitled to, posing a safety concern, both physically and emotionally.

The organization is taking to VR as a way of showing people what these women must go through in order to get the services they need.

Across the Line is a collaborative project by artists Nonny de la Pena, Brad Lichtenstein, and Jeff Fitzsimmons, ringing in at a full seven minutes spent inside a patient’s shoes as she seeks medical attention.

The video begins in a consultation room at Planned Parenthood where the patient is meeting with a doctor, visibly shaken after encountering protesters on her way in. The experience then moves backwards in time, showing the patient’s drive to PP as a sea of protesters line the streets and the surrounding area of the clinic.

The patient asks one of the protesters for directions, and instead he tries to talk her out of her visit. Once she finally makes her way into the parking lot, walking to the front door, she is again bombarded with shouts of religious anger and taunted with name-calling, including “whore” and “slut”.

The experience uses actual recordings from anti-abortion protests, in an attempt to show the very real harassment and abuse that occurs every day outside of PP locations.

Further, instead of simply compiling a video, PP decided to create a virtual reality experiences because studies have found the medium can have a stronger emotional effect on viewers than simple photos and videos. By placing participants in the patient’s shoes, VR lets the user comprehend the full gravity of the situation faced by these brave women.

One can only hope the game will be successful in inspiring empathy in those who seek to shame Planned Parenthood patients, potentially serving as a vehicle for social reform and the de-stigmatization of abortion.

Across the Line can be viewed using Google Clipboard or other compatible VR headsets, as well as viewed in video format here:

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Cody Lewis <![CDATA[MoviePass CEO Explains His Creepy “We Know All About You” Comment]]> http://resourcemagonline.com/?p=88954 2018-04-18T21:13:37Z 2018-04-19T19:00:33Z MoviePass is blowing up. Everyone seems to finally be getting on board with the insane deal in which you pay $9.95 a month and are able to see one movie a day, every day, at participating theaters (which is about 90 percent of them). There are now close to 2.5 million subscribers.  But as the […]

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MoviePass is blowing up.

Everyone seems to finally be getting on board with the insane deal in which you pay $9.95 a month and are able to see one movie a day, every day, at participating theaters (which is about 90 percent of them). There are now close to 2.5 million subscribers. 

But as the tagline to an amazing movie once said: “You don’t get to 500 million friends without making a few enemies.”

Shit, okay, it’s not that dramatic. But it was a little speed bump. A few months back, at an entertainment conference, the CEO of Movie Pass, Mitch Lowe, made a super creepy comment referring to the company’s ability to track it’s users:

“Because you are being tracked in your GPS by the phone, our patent bsically turns on and off our payment system by hooking that card to the device ID on your phone, so we watch how you drive from home to the movies,” said Lowe. “We watch where you go afterwards, and so we know the movies you watch. We know all about you.”

People weren’t happy with the comment for obvious reason. And MoviePass was quick to issue a statement that said they were using location-based marketing to enhance your moving going experiences, not just follow your every movement. A few days later, they also released a new app update which removed some of the app’s location capabilities.

Though the comment doesn’t seem to have done much damage to the company (Yes, it was creepy, but maybe not creepy enough to justify going back to spending $17.40 dollars on a matinee—this is the real-life pricing of a standard ticket in Union Square in NYC), and the company was quick to “save face” as they say, you gotta wonder what the hell was going through Lowe’s head when he made that comment.

Turns out, he just forgot he wasn’t a stand-up comedian.

Speaking to David Pogue at Yahoo, Lowe was asked about his controversial comments and why, if things weren’t as dire as they seemed, did they have to remove certain elements of the app.

Pogue: I can’t have Mitch Lowe here and not ask about this Hollywood conference. What do you track and what did you mean?

Lowe: “Yeah, so I incorrectly use the word “tracking” when what I should have said is, “locating.” What I was referring to is, because we know the address of that theater, and we know the time the movie starts and stops, we can present you with restaurant ideas. We could present you with, “Get a coffee before the movie starts so you don’t go to sleep” ideas. In my exuberance, I was actually trying to be funny, which never pays off. Ted will tell you my jokes aren’t very good.”

[He is referring to Ted Farnsworth, the CEO of MoviePass’s parent company Helios and Matheson Analytics, who was also being interviewed]

Lowe added: “We never have tracked. We never are tracking.”

When Pouge asked him about the change in the app’s Location Services feature, he said:

Lowe: “Yeah. When we got our authorization from Apple, we were given a standard iOS menu that appears when you first open the MoviePass app. It gives you three choices [for Location Services]: ‘Never track me,’ ‘Only track me when the app is open,’ or Always track me. And we offered all three options, even though even if you clicked on ‘Always,’ it actually meant ‘Only when the app is open,’ because we never track when the app isn’t open. But that ‘Always’ option being there was confusing, and so we pulled that. We said, ‘look, we’re only using these two options, so here are the two options.’ It removes the confusion.”

See nothing to worry about! Just a guy making a bad joke. Someone should tell him that open mics are a perfect place to practice jokes before taking them to the main stage.

 

Cinema seats Photo by Denise Jans

 

 

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Bridget Schneider <![CDATA[The Six Best iPhone Photography Apps]]> http://resourcemagonline.com/?p=88946 2018-04-18T20:12:10Z 2018-04-19T17:00:14Z iPhone’s camera software grows more and more advanced with each updated edition, with many photographers choosing to use their phone as their primary means of shooting. While the built-in camera may be incredibly effective in getting you the shot you want, oftentimes the use of a third-party app can further enhance your photo experience, giving […]

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iPhone’s camera software grows more and more advanced with each updated edition, with many photographers choosing to use their phone as their primary means of shooting. While the built-in camera may be incredibly effective in getting you the shot you want, oftentimes the use of a third-party app can further enhance your photo experience, giving you more control over your final product. Apple’s app store has hundreds of apps for this exact purpose, but sifting through them all for one that works best is tedious—and so, here’s the six best photography app for the iPhone:

 

ProCam 5, $5.99

Don’t let the $6 price point deter you, this app is well worth the money. Best for those who know their way around a DSLR, this app replicates many of the features of a high-end camera, giving you maximum control over many things you couldn’t begin to dream of with the iPhone default camera alone. Exposure adjustment, shutter speed,  RAW formats, ISO priority, HDR—it’s all under your control.

 

VSCO, free

As a post-shot editing app, VSCO has hundreds of filters at your disposal, serving as an easy way to get creative with your iPhone photography. You can play around with contrast, temperature, skin tones, exposure and clarity through the apps easy to use functions. While the free version of the app only gets your a handful of filters, you can subscribe to the app for an annual fee of $20 or can purchase in-app bundles for $2.99.

 

Halide Camera, $5.99

This app isn’t as complex as ProCam 5 but is definitely a step up from the iPhone’s built-in cam. With easily navigable settings to control shutter speed, ISO and white balance, you can bring your photo game up a notch. An exceptionally great feature is Halide’s portrait mode, which is especially appealing to those who don’t have already that feature in their phone camera.

 

Camera+, $2.99

This app is for both photo taking and photo editing, making it a one-stop-shop, instead of having to use multiple apps. Like others, this app gives you immaculate control over shutter speed, ISO, and white balance, with the added bonus of a 30 second self timer—3x more than the iPhone camera allows for. Once you’ve taken your photo, you can send it on over to the “Lab” where there are dozens of filters to play around with and stack on top of one another for your desired effect.

 

Cortex Camera, $2.99

This app is perfect for nighttime photography, as it’s specifically made to shoot in very low light and evening settings without forfeiting the quality of your photo. Additionally, the app has electronic image stabilization so you don’t need a tripod to keep your images remain clear and precise.

 

FiLMiC Pro, $14.99

This app isn’t for photos, but I’m including it because it is possibly the best app for editing videos. Sean Baker used this app to edit his full length film Tangerine, as did Steven Soderbergh with Unsane, which goes to show how good the app really is for video production, making its $15 price point seem like nothing. The app gives you maximum control over the recording process, allowing you to control focus peaking, waveform monitoring and even which of the iPhone microphones you want.

 

 

 

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Cody Lewis <![CDATA[Spotting Those Influencers Who May Have “Bought” Their Following]]> http://resourcemagonline.com/?p=88948 2018-04-18T20:00:43Z 2018-04-19T14:00:14Z Hey business owner. Remember TV commercials? Ads in a magazine? Forget that. The barriers of traditional advertising have been broken down. Instagram is the hottest way to spread the word about a new product. According to media kix, over $1 billion/year is spent by advertisers on “influencers.” And though you might have a healthy following of […]

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Hey business owner. Remember TV commercials? Ads in a magazine? Forget that. The barriers of traditional advertising have been broken down. Instagram is the hottest way to spread the word about a new product. According to media kix, over $1 billion/year is spent by advertisers on “influencers.” And though you might have a healthy following of your own, an Instagram Influencer is a great way to reach a new audience while increasing brand awareness and showcasing your product in an authentic way.

But before you find an influencer, or an influencer finds you, you should know that the following they have garnered and the likes they get on a post might might not be legitimate. Yep, that’s right, sometimes these guys can be wolf in sheep’s clothing. People are able to buy their likes and following through the internet. Black market baby. (Okay, not really, but that makes it sound way more badass than it is.) There are companies that will provide an audience of fake “bot” profiles, some that will even like and comment on your post (Please note, sometimes the way grandmothers comment on Instagram sound exactly like bots).

Old school techniques for the modern world.

So how do you make sure that the person you’re about to give a bunch of money to in order to advertise your brand is real? Well let me tell you:

1. Look At The Comments

A quick way to spot a fake following is to go through the comments on an influencer’s post. Is there a lot of activity? Do the comments seem like the comments of real people? Or something a damn bot would say? Are they specific to the post or a super generalized? And does the influencer interact with the community? Sure, a thanks here and there is nice, but an actually response, maybe a back and forth, is going to give you a better idea of if it’s legit. 

2. Creep On Their Followers

If you can’t tell whether the comment is made by a bot or just a robotic person who writes like a robot (aka, grandmothers on Instagram), then just click on profiles. If it’s fake you’ll notice they have no pictures, post, or followers and might not have been updated for years. You can tell. Also, you might not even have to go that far, sometimes the the name of the user will be a bunch of non-words and numbers. Real people don’t do that!

Under the influence.

3. Check The Growth of Their Following 

Most influencers don’t gain a massive following overnight (though, virality does happen). It takes time to get to a point where you are actually influencing—hundreds of post, posting at a consistent rate, community engagement. Real influencers put a lot of energy into what they do—it shouldn’t be hard to gauge whether a profile displays this. Also, go through their post and see if there was suddenly unexplained spike in likes from one photo to the next (again, assuming it wasn’t something viral that made that change). You can even download this Social Blade which will tell you a recent history of the accounts following.

4. Go Beyond Instagram

Most influencers are going to have a presence somewhere else. Facebook maybe, Youtube, most likely Twitter, maybe another app. It’s easier than ever to stalk the hell out of someone these days—this is business baby, and business is never personal. So take a look around and see if they are making moves all around the internet and not just in one place. And these are also other platforms that they maybe able to push your product on, so it’s something you should be checking out anyway.

5. Content Is King

This should be the first thing you do before you start accusing them of Instagram treason. Content is king, as they say. If you don’t like what they are offering, obviously move on. But you should also go back through their post and, overall, see how things are looking—maybe they changed what they do, maybe they only recently found their niche. Even if the following hasn’t been bought and they are authentic, it might be better to find someone whose been in the game for a little longer.

 

See, that’s it! That wasn’t to hard, was it? Use your instincts. You got this.

 

Coca Cola Photo: Caitlyn Hastings

Girl On A Bike Photo: Marion Michele

 

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Alexander Breindel <![CDATA[That Adam Pally Debacle Wasn’t The Only Thing That Happened At The Shorty Awards]]> http://resourcemagonline.com/?p=88956 2018-04-18T19:49:14Z 2018-04-18T20:00:14Z The Shorty Awards are a yearly event meant to honor the “best people and organizations on social media.” Hosted in New York, the event has been around for a decade, and presents such awards as: “Vlogger of the Year,” “Large Agency of the Year,” and “Best Facebook Presence.” This year’s show was held last Sunday, […]

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The Shorty Awards are a yearly event meant to honor the “best people and organizations on social media.” Hosted in New York, the event has been around for a decade, and presents such awards as: “Vlogger of the Year,” “Large Agency of the Year,” and “Best Facebook Presence.”

This year’s show was held last Sunday, April 15th. The actual events of that night, however—including a win by Cardi B—have been overshadowed by one disgruntled presenter’s attacks on the very industry he was hired to present an award to.

Image result for the shorty awards

Adam Pally is best-known for, well…nothing, really, but he was on the Mindy Kaling Project as well as the sitcom Happy Endings. As a professional  goofball, I guess he seemed like a good fit for an up-and-coming awards show playing to a younger crowd. Little did producers know Mr. Pally would, from the moment he stepped on stage, belittle the attendees, the producers, the award he was giving out, and the industry as a whole.

But before we get sucked into this now-ironically-viral story, it’s important to note that some actual things happened at the Shorty Awards. Here are seven:


1. Cardi B won an award, because she’s just killing it right now.Related image

2. Rick & Morty won an award, mostly due to the fact that they made McDonald’s revive their limited-edition Szechuan sauce.

3. Elle Mills won “Breakout Youtuber” of the year, which Casey Neistat totally called would happen a few years ago.

Image result for ellie mills youtube

4. David Dobrick’s Vlog Squad won “Best Youtube Ensemble,” another Neistat-touted talent.

5. Distracted Boyfriend won “Meme of the Year,” which seems oddly regressive.

Image result for distracted boyfriend meme

6. The Unicorn won “Emoji of the Year,” which is utter bullsh** considering there’s a kaaba emoji, not to mention at least nine other better contestants.

7. Marques Brownlee, aka MKBHD, won “Creator of the Decade,” and apparently the friendship of fellow nominee Casey Neistat.


As for Pally, his speech has been much lauded, with seemingly only one writer, Taylor Lorenz at The Daily Beast, taking issue with what she describes as his “rude, entitled rant.” I was hoping Neistat or one of the other creators present might have had something to say on the matter, but so far they’ve been silent.

Anyway, Pally’s comments were delivered with the dry humor and exasperation of a man just waking up from a night of drinking only to discover he has to give a speech at his brother’s wedding in which his brother is marrying a woman he can not stand.

Pally being relieved of his duties

Among other things, Pally said:

  • The award was shaped like a “glass vagina”
  • The Shorty Awards are the “waiting-at-the-DMV of awards shows”
  • The highlight of his career will be “when I’m done”
  • He’s “worried about Backpack Kid (Youtube dancing sensation who appeared with Katy Perry on SNL). Super worried.”
  • If the organization asks him to host next year, he’ll respond with a “hard pass”
  • “This is the worst night of my life”
  • After having his spotlight turned off—to the crowd’s cheering—and then turned back on, Pally mentioned that the darkening was not a sign that he was done, but due to “just another seamless production value”

Eventually, Pally was escorted off-stage by Betty Who, who finished his lines for him. Despite how excruciating the experience obviously was for Pally, it’s likely the most visible thing the comedian has ever done, all thanks to it’s spreading on—that’s right—social media.

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Bridget Schneider <![CDATA[Cocaine Smuggler Blames Crimes On Instagram Addiction]]> http://resourcemagonline.com/?p=88925 2018-04-18T17:14:56Z 2018-04-18T18:00:29Z In a record breaking drug bust, 24 year old Melina Roberge has been sentenced to eight years in prison for smuggling $21 million worth of cocaine aboard a luxury cruise ship. The MS Sea Princess—which sailed through Ireland, the US, Canada, New Zealand, Colombia, and Peru— docked in Sydney, Australia, where it was raided by […]

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In a record breaking drug bust, 24 year old Melina Roberge has been sentenced to eight years in prison for smuggling $21 million worth of cocaine aboard a luxury cruise ship. The MS Sea Princess—which sailed through Ireland, the US, Canada, New Zealand, Colombia, and Peru— docked in Sydney, Australia, where it was raided by the Australian Border Force, leading to the eventual discovery of Roberge and her suitcase full of cocaine.

Roberge, alongside fellow Canadian and former porn star Isabelle Lagace, was offered a first class ticket worth $20,000, in addition to $5,000 in spending money as incentive to participate in the smuggling. Further, she was set to earn $100,000 on top of that if all ran smoothly with the plan. However, it wasn’t really the money Roberge was after.

Melina Roberge

According to Roberge, the real incentive was the lavish destinations and bikini pics she would be able to post to her Instagram, inspiring envy from her followers as she climbed the ranks of social media fame. She was informed that she would serve as a decoy in the operation and was told to “take picture in exotic locations and post them on Instagram to receive ‘likes’.” The money was a bonus compared to the opportunity to present herself as a rich jet-setter, traveling the world with seemingly endless amounts of money to spend on fancy clothes, food, and vacations.

Roberge’s addiction to cultivating Instagram fame started when she met her sugar daddy in 2015. This relationship, in which Roberge received lavish gifts, enabled her sumptuous lifestyle and allowed Roberge to build her online persona as a part of the enviable Instagram elite. The chance to travel the globe, with endless photo ops in each luxurious destination, was too good to pass up.

In Roberge’s hearing, Judge Kate Traill criticized the girl for her vain and foolish motivations, stating, “It is a very sad indictment on her relative age group in society to seem to get self-worth relative to posts on Instagram. This highlights the negative influence of social media on young women…It is sad they seek to attain such a vacuous existence, where how many ‘likes’ they receive is their currency.”

Since her prosecution, Roberge has supposedly seen the fault in her ways, and is committed to warning others of the dangers involved in pursuing social media fame. Her remorse, thought, was not enough to secure her a kinder sentence: Roberge was sentence to a minimum of four years and nine months in prison, with a maximum of eight years.

Great lengths are taken by young women around the world to secure a loyal following of likers, but a line has to be drawn somewhere—before online validation turns into 30 kg of coke and a hefty prison sentence.

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Alexander Breindel <![CDATA[We Checked Out Hasselblad’s 400 MP Camera And Are Convinced Every Museum Needs One]]> http://resourcemagonline.com/?p=88926 2018-04-18T16:43:52Z 2018-04-18T16:43:52Z In January, Hasselblad released details of their absurdly sensitive 400MP multi-shot camera. News of the release obviously sparked exclamations of disbelief from all over the tech blogosphere—Engadget called it “insane,” The Verge called it “bonkers,” and PetaPixel went for the more subdued “monster.” So when I got the opportunity to see it in person, I […]

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In January, Hasselblad released details of their absurdly sensitive 400MP multi-shot camera.

News of the release obviously sparked exclamations of disbelief from all over the tech blogosphere—Engadget called it “insane,” The Verge called it “bonkers,” and PetaPixel went for the more subdued “monster.”

So when I got the opportunity to see it in person, I leapt, heading down to Hasselblad’s offices in NYC to meet with a member of their team, Dan Wang, for a presentation.


I admit I am not well versed in sensors above 100MP. Even that seems like a large figure. But as Dan told me, that’s okay, this camera isn’t for me. Not only is the price more than my writer’s salary could bear—$48,000—but the quality was simply too good. Sure I could take a couple humongous selfies but my pores would look like manholes, and nobody wants that.

So who is the camera for?

Mostly, as Dan explained, for those looking to preserve history: archivists, museums, and extremely dedicated macro photographers. Celebrated macro photographer Göran Liljeberg, for example, was one of the first to test out the new device.

In Hasselblad’s studio, the camera was focused on a replica Monet. Assuming the position of museum curator, I asked Dan to take a picture of it. Afterwards, we analyzed the image on a large monitor, zooming in to reveal the minute paint strokes that could have only been captures on the Hasselblad. It was clear that, for an art history class—in which the smallest details of a painter’s work are dissected—the ability to capture these finer aspects would be a boon to their instruction.

Then we moved on to macro photography.

At first, Dan showed me a zoomed-in image of a butterfly he had taken earlier; I was in disbelief. It didn’t look like a piece of nature, but an intricately designed bead sculpture created by human hands. Zooming out, the image did in fact reveal itself to be a butterfly. Still incredulous, he was forced to show me the original specimen encased in glass. At that point I had no choice but to admit that I was wrong——it was in fact a butterfly.

But who knew butterflies look like that up close?

The alleged butterfly wings

More “wings”

Much like the invention of the microscope, the 400MP multi-shot introduces a world at once familiar and bafflingly foreign. For science instructors hoping to amaze their students with nature’s unseen splendor, the images captured by this Hasselblad will do the trick—I was ready to sign up for a lepidopterology class on the spot.


Of course, a camera is more than just its end consumer experience: there’s a whole lot of innovation going into making that experience possible. Most fascinating about the H6D is its multi-shot method.

In essence, this means that the camera—taking four 100 MP images—captures each and every pixel in all four colors of the GRGB spectrum. Then, it circles back—moving 1/2 a pixel horizontally, and then 1/2 a pixel vertically—to capture all the spaces in between the pixels. This allows the camera to construct an image using almost 0 guesswork—it’s captured all it needs, and has only the melding of colors left. These 6 images result in an effective resolution of 400MP.

An illustration of the first four shots, which capture each pixel in GRGB

An illustration of the second step, indicating the 1/2 pixel shifts horizontally and vertically

Obviously, this requires that each image be identical, and therein lies the greatest difficult of the H6D. When I arrived, it was strapped into a large stationary contraption; even still, a knock on the floor in between image-making would result in an imaging error. Luckily, the H6D’s software alerts the user when an error occurs, meaning you don’t have to wait until post to find out you f***ed up. Still, it requires an isolated space—a basement perhaps—to work effectively, further delimiting its possible uses.


Before leaving, I asked Dan about possible artistic employments of the H6D. Some artists, it seems, had taken advantage of the camera’s sensitivity to create large, blurred photos evoking nightmarish, yet colorful rorschach tests. While the trend is unlikely to catch on, it’s always nice to see a piece of finely-tuned equipment used incorrectly for aesthetic purposes.

Overall, the H6D is a step forward (excuse the hyperbole here) for mankind. The images it allows are unlike any other documentation method we have. More than preserving paintings, it allows us to preserve paint strokes. Similarly, rather than merely documenting insects, it documents the most unexpected intricacies of their frame.

While I’ll almost certainly never be able to purchase an H6D for myself, I sure hope our cultural institutions do. Even in a time of deep budget cuts, the H6D’s value speaks for itself in the wonder that it evokes in a viewer’s widened eyes.


SPECS and DEETS

You didn’t think I was going to leave you without the specs on this baby, did you?

As for purchasing options, the H6D can be found on B&H.

They also offer rental options through your local Hasselblad sales representative. The price is listed at 399 euros/day (about $500) but can be discounted up to 50% for longer-term rentals.

 

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Cody Lewis <![CDATA[The Winning Images of The 61st World Press Photo Contest]]> http://resourcemagonline.com/?p=88877 2018-04-17T16:04:14Z 2018-04-17T19:00:54Z The winning images of the 61st World Press Photo Contest have been announced for  2018. The annual contest awards the best journalistic images. This year’s winners were selected out of 73,044 images taken by 4,548 photographers from 125 different countries. The contest dates back to 1955, when a group of Dutch photographs, seeing to expose their […]

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The winning images of the 61st World Press Photo Contest have been announced for  2018. The annual contest awards the best journalistic images. This year’s winners were selected out of 73,044 images taken by 4,548 photographers from 125 different countries.

The contest dates back to 1955, when a group of Dutch photographs, seeing to expose their work to audiences all over the world, organized the international contest. It is now one the most prestigious in the world.

The website summarizes the competition:

“We showcase stories that make people stop, feel, think and act. We encourage diverse accounts of the world that present stories with different perspectives. We exhibit those stories to a worldwide audience, educate the profession and the public on their making, and encourage debate on their meaning. We are a global platform connecting professionals and audiences through trustworthy visual journalism and storytelling.”

“Kid Jockeys” by Alain Schroeder. First Prize Stories: Sports.

Apart from from a single image winner of the The World Press Photo of the Year, there are also “singles” image winners as well as “stories” (containing 2 to 10 photos) across eight categories.

These categories include:

  • spot news: witnessing news moments or immediate events.
  • contemporary issues: documenting cultural, political or social issues affecting individuals or societies.
  • environment: documenting human impact, positive or negative, on the environment.
  • general news: reporting on news topics and their aftermaths.
  • nature: showing flora, fauna and landscapes in their natural state.
  • people: individuals or groups either in observed or posed portraits.
  • sports: that capture individual or team sports.
  • long-term projects: a project on a single theme shot over at least three different years

The prize-winning photographs are assembled into an exhibition that travels to 100 cities in 45 countries reaching an audience of over 4 million people. A book will also be published with the winning images and will available for purchase.

World Press Photo of the Year & First Prize Singles: Spot News

“Venezuela Crisis” by Ronaldo Schemidt

First Prize Singles: Contemporary Issues

“Lagos Waterfronts under Threat” by Jesco Denzel

First Prize Singles: Environment

“Waiting For Freedom” by Neil Aldridge

First Prize Singles: General News

“Rohingya Crisis” by Patrick Brown

First Prize Singles: Nature

“Dumpster Diver” by Corey Arnold

First Prize Singles: People

“Resignation Syndrome” by Magnus Wennman

First Prize Singles: Sports

“Royal Shrovetide Football” by Oliver Scarff

First Prize Stories: Long-Term Projects

“Ich Bin Waldviertel” by Carla Kogelman

These are only the winners of the “Singles” Category. Head over to World Press Photo to see the stories behind each photo as well as the winners of the “stories” category. You can also see the 2nd and 3rd place photos in both “single” and “stories” and hear the stories as well.

 

Cover Photo: “Demonstrator Catches Fire” by Juan Barreto. Third Prize Stories: Spot News

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Cody Lewis <![CDATA[1840s Photos Are Brought To Life With Color]]> http://resourcemagonline.com/?p=88860 2018-04-17T15:57:01Z 2018-04-17T16:00:24Z “They are the oldest generation of human beings to be photographed,” Matt Loughrey told the Daily Mail. Loughrey is a professional colorizer (and the artist behind My Colorful Past) who recently restored color to photographs from the 1840s. Taken by early American photographer Mathew Brady, the 12 images captured Americans living in New York; they […]

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“They are the oldest generation of human beings to be photographed,” Matt Loughrey told the Daily Mail.

Loughrey is a professional colorizer (and the artist behind My Colorful Past) who recently restored color to photographs from the 1840s. Taken by early American photographer Mathew Brady, the 12 images captured Americans living in New York; they are the earliest known portrait photographs to ever be taken. The subjects in the photos are older and no doubt wealthy (as photography was expensive and only accessible for those with money) and most likely lived through the American Revolution—just to put that in perspective.

 

The technique used to capture these images was called daguerreotype. This involved polishing a sheet of silver-plated copper to a mirror finish and treating it with fumes to make its surface light sensitive. The photographer would then expose the copper to the camera—for brightly sunlit subjects, just a few seconds, for less light, much longer. The resulting latent image (not yet made visible by developing) would then be visible by fuming it with mercury vapor, using a liquid chemical treatment to remove its sensitivity to light, then rinsing and drying the image before sealing behind glass. The images were delicate and could be easily ruined so they had to be placed in a protective enclosure.

The image below may be familiar to some as it is a photograph of a woman who, for years, was wrongly thought to be Susan B. Anthony. This was recently disproven and the identity of the woman is still unknown.

It’s crazy to think that photography has been around for nearly 200 years. Since the first shot (or at least earliest surviving photograph) taken in 1820’s by Joseph Nicephore, photography has come a long way. From that first nearly indiscernible image of an upstairs window in the Burgundy region of France to smartphones and drones and nearly everyone’s ability to capture a decent image, we have seen a vast array of photography techniques develop as technology furthers the medium.

But at the end of the day, despite the years gone by, photography is still about—and will always be about—capturing an image and a moment in the time. And these images from the 1840s are the epitome of that. The color enhances that experience, bringing out a certain humanity that, to me, is lacking in old black and white photograph. It’s an amazing project.

You can find similar images through Matt Loughrey’s photo project My Colorful Past where he brings historic photos to life with color.

Here is the Instagram & Facebook.

 

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Elisabeth Heleba <![CDATA[This Week in Creepy Trends: The Story Behind Post-Mortem Photography]]> http://resourcemagonline.com/?p=88781 2018-04-20T05:32:31Z 2018-04-17T14:03:15Z If you’ve wandered through Tumblr in the past five years, you’ve probably come across those creepy images of the Victorian era. You know the ones: everyone is standing deathly still, their mouths formed in strained grimaces, their eyes bleak and dead looking. Along with some these images, you probably came across a short explanation as […]

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If you’ve wandered through Tumblr in the past five years, you’ve probably come across those creepy images of the Victorian era. You know the ones: everyone is standing deathly still, their mouths formed in strained grimaces, their eyes bleak and dead looking.

Along with some these images, you probably came across a short explanation as to why the figures appear so lifeless. You were probably told that the images are relics of a trend that swept Victorian England and the Americas when cameras first landed in the public’s hand—post-mortem photography.

Post-mortem photography is a practice in which photographs are taken of dead family members before they get lowered into the ground. Supposedly it was all the rage because back then people died so young and so easily.

It’s a disturbing idea. No one in the modern world wants to deal with death, let alone stand next to it for a picture. Yet there is something fascinating about a culture that celebrates the end of life this way. It almost makes sense that the public’s reaction when presented with the camera would be to use it to remember their loved ones before they placed them in the grave.

The point is, even if we can’t understand the notion behind it, it’s easy to believe that the practice existed. The culture of the Victorian is so foreign to us that most people don’t even question if the eerie trend was real.

Recently, however, numerous people have begun claiming that the lifeless bodies in these images aren’t dead—they’re just stiff.

Legend says that the subjects in the photographs must be dead, because we can see stands holding them up. However, some folks did their research and found that the stands were actually used to keep the subjects still. Back then, with an exposure time as long as a minute and a half, it could be hard to remain in place without them.

In addition to the long exposures, cameras in the late 1800s were still dealing with kinks here and there that our own technology has long since dispelled.  One of these affected color—the chemical processes used at the time were prone to make green eyes look white and bodies look discolored. The eerie eyes and detached limbs that have been spotted in many of the photos and cited as evidence of their gloomy backstories could have simply been errors in the development process.

To put a nail in the coffin (so to speak), Victorian photography expert, Mike Zohn, has pointed out that a dead body would be way too heavy for a posing stand, anyway.  And if one were to look at historical records of the posing stand, they would see that, “not a single bit of it mentions anything about dead people.”

Despite all of these facts brought on by the they’re-not-dead side of the argument, the internet is still filled with true believers of the post-mortem photography craze. They simply can not get over the idea that those grimaces belong to living people.

So, like much else, the internet remains in dissent over the topic.  Was post-mortem photography a real trend?  Or was it just an idea invented by a bunch of overzealous internet users?  The world may never know.

Feature Image found on the Met Museum Public Domain

 

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Alexander Breindel <![CDATA[Chinese Competitor Xiaomi Weighing Purchase of Struggling GoPro]]> http://resourcemagonline.com/?p=88871 2018-04-16T17:27:51Z 2018-04-16T18:30:45Z GoPro was looking for a buyer, but is this how they wanted it to go down? The Information reported last week that Xiaomi, producer of the 4k+— a cheaper competitor to the popular GoPro Hero6 —has “weighed whether to make an offer” the purchase the company. This followed reporting that DJI had earlier been briefed […]

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GoPro was looking for a buyer, but is this how they wanted it to go down?

The Information reported last week that Xiaomi, producer of the 4k+— a cheaper competitor to the popular GoPro Hero6 —has “weighed whether to make an offer” the purchase the company.

the 4k+

This followed reporting that DJI had earlier been briefed on the possibility of buying GoPro several months ago, ultimately declaring the firm worthless

Intense competition and an auspicious failure in the drone market—ending in their complete withdrawal earlier this year—have plagued the once-mighty company. Since going public in 2014, they’ve seen their value contract by two-thirds to $1 billion.

In January, CNBC reported that GoPro hired JPMorgan to explore a sale. CEO Nick Woodman denied actively pursuing a sale, while noting it was “something that [GoPro]  would consider.”

The news comes after GoPro recently unveiled the HERO, a more utilitarian model of their classic action camera, priced at $199. The release followed Woodman declaring months earlier that the company would be “expanding [its] entry level customer base” to counter increasingly cheap competition.

The Verge reported in November that GoPro had “big plans” for 2018, with “several” more products to come. Woodman also noted at the time that the company was expecting its first profitable quarter in two years.

GoPro CEO and founder Nick Woodman

Reactions to the possibility of a Xiaomi purchase have been enthusiastic, sending GoPro’s stock soaring 8.8% since the announcement.  One bullish writer on Bloomberg noted hopefully that Xiaomi could “Be the Hero GoPro Needs”.

He warned, however, that the Chinese electronics maker should “leave the GoPro name alone”—a concern shared by loyal customers—as well as allow their team to operate independently out of their California offices.

Should Xiaomi decide GoPro is worth the price, they’ll still have to clear US regulatory hurdles;. Bloomberg notes that the current trade spat with China isn’t “conducive” to a deal getting cleared.

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